About the Project

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What is a Comprehensive Plan?

A comprehensive plan is an instrument of government that is designed to give a local jurisdiction within the Commonwealth of Virginia responsibility for managing development, services and public infrastructure. According to State code, the comprehensive plan is general in nature and may include, but is not limited to, the designation of land use, community facilities and services, and historic areas. The code mandates the inclusion of a transportation plan.

A comprehensive plan includes a concise statement of the community’s goals for long-range development, as well as objectives for implementing the goals. The goals provide general direction based on the aspirations of the community. Objectives provide further direction for achieving an aspect of a goal.

This Town Plan serves those purposes for the Town of Leesburg. More particularly, it serves as the general guide for the Town Council in its legislative role, the Planning Commission in its advisory role, and the role of other Boards and Commissions in the Town, Town staff, citizens, business owners and land-owners with respect to directing development and redevelopment in the Town.

Town Plan Update

While the planning horizon for a Comprehensive Plan is typically long-range in nature, it's important to review and update the plan in the interim to ensure the vision described in the plan is still relevant to the community. The Town's existing Town Plan was last revised in 2012. Since that time, many of the plan's goals have been completed and new opportunities have been presented.

With extensive public participation, the Town will create a playbook that outlines the steps needed to achieve the community's vision.


Project Timeline



What is a Comprehensive Plan?

A comprehensive plan is an instrument of government that is designed to give a local jurisdiction within the Commonwealth of Virginia responsibility for managing development, services and public infrastructure. According to State code, the comprehensive plan is general in nature and may include, but is not limited to, the designation of land use, community facilities and services, and historic areas. The code mandates the inclusion of a transportation plan.

A comprehensive plan includes a concise statement of the community’s goals for long-range development, as well as objectives for implementing the goals. The goals provide general direction based on the aspirations of the community. Objectives provide further direction for achieving an aspect of a goal.

This Town Plan serves those purposes for the Town of Leesburg. More particularly, it serves as the general guide for the Town Council in its legislative role, the Planning Commission in its advisory role, and the role of other Boards and Commissions in the Town, Town staff, citizens, business owners and land-owners with respect to directing development and redevelopment in the Town.

Town Plan Update

While the planning horizon for a Comprehensive Plan is typically long-range in nature, it's important to review and update the plan in the interim to ensure the vision described in the plan is still relevant to the community. The Town's existing Town Plan was last revised in 2012. Since that time, many of the plan's goals have been completed and new opportunities have been presented.

With extensive public participation, the Town will create a playbook that outlines the steps needed to achieve the community's vision.


Project Timeline



Guest Book

Tell us what's important to you! What should we be thinking about as we move forward with the new Town Plan?

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Everyone has or should have the right to sell their property and make as much money as they can (Property rights)People will continue to come, businesses will come and they need to house employees...no businesses, no tax revenue deferred from the homes, higher taxes or less services.....IHOP and Johnsons House of Beef were our only 2 restaurants in Leesburg when I moved here in 1977. No lively downtown, streets dark by 6, nowhere to shop for clothes and very few grocery store options. Change comes...how we manage it matters. Let's focus on how fortunate we are that Leesburg is growing and changing, that people are focusing on more public art, music, events, gathering places, successful businesses, MANY places to eat and shop....Nostalgia has it's place, I remember Leesburg of 1977 fondly but I wouldn't want to go back there. Anticipate growth and manage it impacts as much as we can, that's my initial thought about what we focus on. Gwen Pangle

Gwen Pangle 10 months ago

Not sure if this is the correct forum for this comment, but I wanted to thank the Town for the Workshop hosted at Ida Lee yesterday. The projects were fun and informative and gave me a better sense of what the Town is trying to accomplish with Legacy Leesburg. I hope to host at least on On The Table event this month -- the Workshop has inspired me! Thank you!

Cherie Jones 11 months ago

I am very concerned that the Town seems focused on growth. What attracted myself and probably most residents to Leesburg is the quaint downtown, with amenities, but not too big. As a resident for 26 years and friends with many lifetime residents, I emplore the town to focus on services, and leave the growth to Ashburn or lansdowne. Keep the Town of Leesburg - small town. If the Town Budget from taxes is in line with current services - stop growing

Jdelalian 11 months ago

I agree that the Town needs to consider the quality of life of its current residents above the concerns of developers. Do those developers live in the Town? Do they pay taxes? Do they vote for Council members? My guess is what finally pushed the Council over the edge on the Church-Market Street development was all the tax revenue the developer promised. You know what, raise my taxes if you need more money, but don't destroy what makes this place special by turning it into just another contrived "town center". Thanks for the opportunity to comment!

Cherie Jones 11 months ago

The town needs to realize the residents of this town are tired of the town only considering revenue and keep what made this town so charming and desirable, small!! Every speck of dirt/cornfield has been built on or have plans to be built on, I miss the days of driving home from work, looking out over a cornfield on my way home. In addition to loosing the charm it has caused a traffic nightmare, it's bad and heaven forbid you have to get out during the 4-6 time frame, by the time you get where you are going you are so upset and frustrated, it just doesn't make sense to live like this. We moved here 18 years ago from Southern California, and we've loved it; however, for the first time in 18 years, I was driving home from Sterling and thought to myself, "there are too many people here now, maybe we should move" I've never actually had that conscience thought until then. I'd hate to leave but Leesburg has lost it's charm, chasing after the money. People come to Leesburg now to visit the shops and restaurants, we don't need ANYMORE HOMES!!!Thank you for your time.

kellyo 11 months ago

Just because we CAN squeeze more housing into the town limits DOESN"T MEAN WE SHOULD!! The developers who push these residential building proposals don't have to live with the (traffic) consequences of their plans. Going through the center of town is about as congested as I can tolerate, as it stands now, during rush hour. I can't imagine how bad it's going to be in 5 years with all of these additional units planned!

Karen P 11 months ago

Balanced, sustainable growth. Development that pays for itself rather than requiring the taxpayer to subsidize it down the line. Mixed use developments should use residential density bonuses to increase the commercial square footage in town, improve transportation corridors, enhance recreational opportunities, and contribute to stream restorations and the towns tree canopy. We are permitting too much residential and not getting enough back for those bonuses.

JulieBolthouse 11 months ago